Day of Service: Every. Day.

The Osborne Group will be closed on Monday – but we won’t be off.  Perhaps like you, we mlk day of service 2014honor Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. with a “day on” volunteering with our families, rather than a day off.  In the not-for-profit world, we recognize that every day is a Day of Service.  Or it could be…  To help you expand the ways that you engage the whole family of your donors, investors and volunteers in a Day of Service throughout the year, here are some ideas we’ve collected from the team:

  1. Host an on-site work day with a variety of projects that pile up over the year:  from raking leaves or clearing out and organizing closets, to identifying and calling volunteers from the past six months to thank them, or cataloging the collateral material you’ve created over the past five years in one neat file. Create a menu of options for a Saturday…
  2. Host a Philanthropy Forum for Families to discuss how families can help children and grandchildren embrace philanthropy, develop their own philosophy, or help other children and families in need.
  3. Establish volunteer opportunities where corporate partners’ staff, service club members, and other engaged groups and their families have the opportunity to work directly with the people, animals, and habitats you serve.  Later in the year, share with the individuals who volunteered pictures of recipients enjoying the facilities they helped improve.
  4. Create a series of one minute videos of the children of donors speaking about helping others.
  5. If you have a “Friends Asking Friends” event (i.e. run, walk, bowl, etc): create specific opportunities, materials, ideas for families to get involved.
  6. Help families achieve their resolution of being more financially responsible by teaching their kids about smart money planning (including budgeting for charity). Websites like Oink.com let parents give their kids a set amount of money which they then can budget and spend or give with their parent’s oversight.
  7. Lead a hike, run a program, give a tour geared to families – one for teens with ways to take this back to their middle school or high school, one for families with younger kids to introduce them to what you do.
  8. Share “three ways you can advocate for us” via social media; include a variety that includes calling a legislator, and speaking up for your cause among friends, neighbors, your employer or at school
  9. Develop an annual calendar of family-friendly activities to keep philanthropy top of mind all year round to send to donors and hand out at events. It might include things to do around certain holidays or tips for key times of year.
  10. Include a family volunteer/donor profile in your newsletter and/or annual report.
  11. Run a Volunteer Job Fair with other NFPs to recruit short term and long term volunteers.
  12. Look for ways to engage teen-aged of donors mentoring others – lots of schools require community service or service learning, many kids look for bar or bat mitzvah projects.
  13. Host a roundtable discussion with different stakeholder groups – or mixed stakeholder groups: What does our community need most from our community-based organizations? What does our community do well? Where are the holes?
  14. … or host a panel discussion on raising generous and grateful children; invite the community to participate.
  15. Invite major gift donors to an event being held in a program area where their gift made an impact. Instead of just inviting the donor, invite his or her family to the event and place them in volunteer roles during the event, through which they will be able to have meaningful interactions with clients.
  16. Create a special recognition category for family giving. Families that make your organization their family charity of choice are recognized as such and have a specific set of stewardship activities. Maybe develop a Family Giving Circle and hold special stewardship events for members.
  17. Establish a Family Giving Back Day; invite families of donors to a day of providing service to clients and their families – everything from reviewing resumes, job interview techniques, repairing and painting toys, organic gardening, healthy cooking, learning about social networking, and so forth.
  18. In all your donor visits, seek their advice about the best ways to engage the children of donors!
  19. Incorporate a golf clinic (or sport, or other talent clinic) into your special events, enabling donors to engage with your beneficiaries or their children.
  20. Look for ways that the recipients of your services can connect to and interact with your donors and investors – philanthropy is a two-way street.

And of course… Be sure to include family members (when appropriate) in your stewardship in individual donors and volunteers!

One thought on “Day of Service: Every. Day.

  1. Engaging families leads to major gifts and the research supports this. When families are engage, high net-worth individuals give three times more when their children are involved in their philanthropy. This list is not only good, but it’s strategic.

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